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Newborn Hearing Screening Program

4513-1023

funding levels adjusted for inflation (CPI)

  • Funding History
  • Description
  • Proposals
Adjusted for inflation (CPI) NOT adjusted
FY18 $80,817 $80,817
FY17 $82,626 $80,817
FY16 $79,924 $76,748
FY15 $80,460 $76,748
FY14 $78,200 $74,061
FY13 $75,268 $70,193
FY12 $71,412 $65,494
FY11 $73,509 $65,494
FY10 $81,839 $71,497
FY09 $97,184 $84,076
FY08 $97,354 $83,060
FY07 $100,966 $83,060
FY06 $103,590 $83,060
FY05 $107,503 $83,060
FY04 $110,733 $83,060
FY03$0$0
FY02 $111,320 $79,937
FY01 $141,726 $100,000
  • See Changes in Funding
Between and
Funding for Newborn Hearing Screening Program
17.0%

comparisons adjusted for inflation (CPI)

Notes

  • In FY03, there was funding for the Newborn Hearing Screening program within the Family Planning (Family Health Services) line item (4513-1000).
  • Use caution comparing funding for this line item FY09-FY10. In FY10, funding for information technology was taken out of this line item and shifted to a centralized information technology account. The exact amount of this accounting change is not available.

The Massachusetts Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program helps ensure that every baby in the Commonwealth receives a hearing screening, early diagnosis, and access to intervention services when diagnosed with hearing loss.

Hearing loss is a common congenital disorder that affects one to six of every 1,000 newborn babies. Lifetime costs of treatment and services for people with hearing loss are lower when an early diagnosis is made. Legislation enacted in 1998 requires that all newborn infants in Massachusetts receive a hearing screening test in hospitals and other birthing facilities before discharge, and requires health insurers to cover the cost of the screening. Babies who do not pass the hearing screening are referred to audiological diagnostic centers for follow-up examinations. If an infant does not have health coverage (such as through private insurance or MassHealth) the state reimburses the cost of follow-up exams. Program staff follows up with families whose infants have failed a screening and assist them in finding appropriate services and supports, including enrollment in an Early Intervention program.

The Department of Public Health (DPH) develops screening protocols and regulations that govern hospital screenings, approves audiological follow-up centers, and it also operates a statewide surveillance and tracking system that enables the DPH to implement and evaluate the screening program. Because most screening costs are covered by insurance, funding from this line item goes chiefly for follow-up and family support services.

Adjusted for inflation (CPI) NOT adjusted
FY18 GAA $80,817 $80,817
FY18 Leg $80,817 $80,817
FY18 Sen $82,396 $82,396
FY18 SWM $82,396 $82,396
FY18 Hou $82,396 $82,396
FY18 HWM $82,396 $82,396
FY18 Gov $82,396 $82,396
FY17 $82,626 $80,817

Notes

  • In FY03, there was funding for the Newborn Hearing Screening program within the Family Planning (Family Health Services) line item (4513-1000).
  • Use caution comparing funding for this line item FY09-FY10. In FY10, funding for information technology was taken out of this line item and shifted to a centralized information technology account. The exact amount of this accounting change is not available.